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Information on press releases and related news of the department "Health, Long‐Term Care and Pensions".

Citizen Science-Projekt startet unter Beteiligung des SOCIUM

Das Bundesforschungsministerium hat die Förderung 15 neuer Projekte im Bereich Citizen Science bekanntgegeben. Über eine Laufzeit von bis zu vier Jahren werden Projekte gefördert, in denen Bürger:innen selbst zu Forschenden werden, indem sie ihre Expertise und ihr Erfahrungswissen einbringen. Dabei wird wechselseitig das Verhältnis von Forschungssubjekt und Forschungsobjekt erneuert, indem die Bürger:innen aus erster Hand erfahren, wie Wissenschaft funktioniert und die Wissenschaft Zugang zu neuen Ideen, Perspektiven und Daten erhält.
Im Verbundprojekt Be_WIZZARD ist das SOCIUM unter der Koordination der Kreisvolkshochschule Ammerland als wissenschaftlicher Partner beteiligt. Bis Ende 2024 werden Senior:innen im Ammerland in die Erforschung von Gelingensbedingungen guter Pflege einbezogen. Ausgangspunkt ist dabei die Vertrautheit mit lokalen Strukturen und Problemlagen, aus denen die konkreten Forschungsprojekte abgeleitet werden. Im Ergebnis sollen so die regionalen Gelingensbedingungen guter Pflege partizipativ erforscht werden, um daraus Handlungsempfehlungen für die politischen Akteure abzuleiten.


Contact:
Thomas Kalwitzki
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58544
E-Mail: thomas.kalwitzki@uni-bremen.de

Research team at SOCIUM presents BARMER Long-Term Care Report 2020

This year's BARMER Long-Term Care Report was presented today at the Conference Centre of the Federal Press Conference House in Berlin. The Report focuses this year on the analysis of stress and health status among care workers. The working time of 26,000 care workers was lost in the year 2017 due to an above-average disease burden. The Report discusses current long-term care policy with regard to the ongoing care crisis – particularly in the light of additional burdens brought on by the Corona pandemic. The authors – Professor Dr. Heinz Rothgang, Dr. Rolf Müller and Benedikt Preuß – carried out in-depth studies of case numbers, incidences, prevalences and long-term care trajectories. The figures are based primarily on the long-term care statistics for the year 2017 provided by the Federal Office of Statistics as well as routine claims data of the BARMER health insurance fund.

Workload considerably heavier in long-term care

Workloads have increased considerably in many respects for care workers. Around 92 per cent of geriatric care workers report that they often carry out their work standing up (cf. 47 per cent reported in other occupations). Seventy-six per cent of geriatric care workers report having to frequently lift and carry heavy weights (as against 15 per cent in other occupations). Working in forced postures is reported significantly more frequently (45 percent as compared to 11 per cent). Fifty-two per cent of geriatric carers report that they often have to comply with rules relating to minimum performance or stipulated times for carrying out specific tasks (as against 27 per cent in other occupations). Other pressures include frequent deadline and performance pressures (reported by 63 per cent compared to 50 per cent in other occupations); frequently having to work very quickly is reported by 53 per cent (cf. 39 per cent), and 31 per cent of geriatric care workers claim that they frequently reach the limits of their endurance (as against 16 per cent in other occupations). All these burdens are also reported to be stressful more frequently by care workers than by workers in other occupations.

Poorer Health Status among Care Workers

Correspondingly, care workers are found to be altogether in poorer health than workers in other occupations. This correlation is shown by all measurement methods used. Survey results, the analysis of outpatient diagnoses, absence rates, prescriptions and hospitalisation figures all show that care workers are more seriously affected by musculoskeletal, psychic and behavioural disorders. Though in many areas the workload is similar for qualified and for auxiliary geriatric care workers, the health status of auxiliary workers is poorer than among qualified care workers.

Very high absence rates through illness among care workers

Sickness rates stood at 7.2 per cent in 2017 among qualified geriatric care workers, and as high as 8.7 per cent among auxiliary carers; in other occupations, the sickness rate was 5.0 per cent.  The above-average working time lost through sickness is calculated by multiplying the difference in sickness rates by the number of care workers. This surplus work time lost amounts to the working time of well over 24,000 care workers in the year 2017.
On average, within the year 2017 3.9 out of 1,000 geriatric care workers and six out of 1,000 auxiliary workers are granted disability pensions, while the rate among other occupations is three per 1,000. The above-average early retirement rates led to a loss of almost 2,000 care workers in 2017. The aggregate of above-aberage sickness-related absence times and the above-average entry into disability retirement pensions corresponds to the working time of 26,000 care workers lost in 2017 alone.

There is no alternative but to hire more staff

Current employment figures in care work are inadequate to ensure both professional care and salubrious working conditions. The work intensification arising out of this leads to an excessive workload and negative health effects for employees. This situation generates increased absence through sickness, and more people changing occupations, which in turn aggravates the care crisis. The vicious circle is complete when the remaining care workers are burdened with an even greater workload. This vicious circle has to be broken to ensure sustainable, quality-assured care work – and it can only be broken by employing more staff.

Downloads (all in German only):
BARMER Care Report 2020
Statement by Prof. Rothgang at the Press Conference
PresentatIon given by Prof. Rothgang at the Press Conference



Contact:
Prof. Dr. Heinz Rothgang
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58557
E-Mail: rothgang@uni-bremen.de

Dr. rer. pol. Rolf Müller
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58554
E-Mail: rmint@uni-bremen.de

Benedikt Preuß
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 1
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58647
E-Mail: bpreuss@uni-bremen.de

Heinz Rothgang als Sachverständiger bei Anhörung zum Gesetz zur Verbesserung der Gesundheitsversorgung und Pflege


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Heinz Rothgang
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58557
E-Mail: rothgang@uni-bremen.de

The Innovation Report 2020 evaluates drugs that entered the German market in 2017

This year's Innovation Report rates 31 active ingredients of medicines launched in 2017.

 

 

Innovation Report 2020:

long version

short version

Presentation of Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58559
E-Mail: gglaeske@uni-bremen.de

Improvement of the Databases | Strategic Development of Prevention Measures | Protection of Civil Rights

The aim of the present paper is to scientifically elucidate the current epidemiological crisis and to draw recommendations from the given situation for effective preventive measures. The proposals for prevention are placed within a sociopolitical framework that, in the view of the authors, is inextricably connected with the current circumstances. The comprehensive analytical section is preceded by a brief overview of the established positions. The authors endeavour to clearly point out the facts and issues at hand, thereby avoiding any criticism of the actors who in the past few weeks have had to make crucial decisions on the basis of information that one might say was “even more incomplete” than it is today. The statements made in this position paper are intended as a constructive contribution towards supporting the strategies taken in the coming weeks.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58559
E-Mail: gglaeske@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske Foto Raphael Huenerfauth, Photothek.netProf. Dr. Gerd Glaeske Foto Raphael Huenerfauth, Photothek.net
Gerd Glaeske believes increasing supply shortages are likely

More than 75 percent of all medication prescriptions are so called generics. Most of these drugs are made in India and China. This means long supply chains. Quality, manufacturing conditions and reliability might suffer. In China, the regions in which the products are manufactured are also affected by the corona virus, which will certainly exacerbate the delivery difficulties.

More information


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58559
E-Mail: gglaeske@uni-bremen.de

Authors from the SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy at the University of Bremen present the BARMER Long-Term Care Report for 2019

This year's BARMER Long-Term Care Report was presented today at the Conference Centre of the Federal Press Conference House in Berlin. The analysis of new living arrangements with long-term care provision is the central focus of this year’s Report. It also includes a review of LTC insurance 25 years since its inception. As in previous years, the authors – Professor Dr. Heinz Rothgang and Dr. Rolf Müller – continue to deliver in-depth analyses of case numbers, incidences, prevalences and long-term care trajectories. The data used for the Report are primarily long-term care statistics for the year 2017 and claims data provided by the health insurance fund BARMER.

Downloads:
BARMER Long-Term Care Report 2019 (in German)
Statement prepared by Professor Rothgang for the Press Conference
Presentation given by Professor Rothgang at the Press Conference


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Heinz Rothgang
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58557
E-Mail: rothgang@uni-bremen.de

Dr. rer. pol. Rolf Müller
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58554
E-Mail: rmint@uni-bremen.de

Cover Innovationsreport 2019Cover Innovationsreport 2019
Study on innovative medicines of the year 2016 in day to day care

This year's Innovation Report rates 21 active ingredients of the total of 31 medicines launched in 2016.

Oncologics were most frequently evaluated, five drugs contain antiviral drugs, three are recombinant coagulation factors. The remaining active ingredients cover eight further indications. For the first time, a vaccine (the HPV vaccine, which i.a. protects against cervical cancer) was rated in this report. Eight medicines were launched with a fast track assessment.

The special chapter of the report is dedicated to the current topic "vaccination and compulsory vaccination" and discusses measles, HPV and flu vaccines in particular.

The data of the RKI, the KiGGS study and the WHO state that the measles vaccination rates have still not been reached. They show that compulsory vaccination, which has already been introduced in some European countries, has not eliminated measles. The Innovation Report 2019 presents various approaches how an increase in vaccination rates could succeed and how the potential arguments of the anti-vaxxers could be. It illustrates the great importance of physician-patient communication in this context. Compulsory measles vaccination should be the ultima ratio - education and information campaigns need to be developed and strengthened in the public.

Although five medicines were rated with a green overall traffic light, the increase in red traffic lights (61% of all assessed medicines) has degraded the hope of a positive development of newly licensed medicines compared to the last year. For six medicines red hand letters with important information for physicians and patients were sent. This also confirms the assumption that current approval studies provide only a limited picture of effects and side effects, therefore pharmacovigilance studies in the "aftermarket" are urgently needed.

Medicines that represent a true therapeutic innovation and have been assessed with a green (added) benefit signal are human papillomavirus vaccines and medicines in cancer treatment of multiple myeloma (Daratumumab and Elotuzumab) and in the treatment of chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (Sacubitril/Valsartan). Only one medicine (Elbasvir/Grazoprevir) is cheaper than the ACT and has been given a green light in this category. Regarding the price twelve medicines were rated as equally expensive (marked with a yellow traffic light) and four medicines as more expensive (marked with a red traffic light). In comparison with already available therapies, five medicines are marked in green, four in yellow, and 14 in red. Thus, only nine of the new medicines on the market contribute to already approved pharmaceuticals in a positive way.

 

Innovation Report 2019:

long version

short version

Presentation of Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58559
E-Mail: gglaeske@uni-bremen.de

Thomas Kalwitzki at an Expert Hearing of the Committee on Health Care of the German Federal Parliament

On 8 May 2019 the Committee on Health Care of the German Federal Parliament (Deutscher Bundestag) organized a hearing attended by 17 experts and representatives of interest groups. The subject were the motions of the Green Party, the Left Party and the Free Democratic Party on a reform of the financing of the nursing care insurance. Heinz Rothgang had written an expert opinion on the issue and Thomas Kalwitzki answered questions at the hearing itself.

Rothgang and Kalwitzki point to a significant amount of unfairness between the two branches of the statutory nursing care insurance: the private obligatory nursing care insurance and the public nursing care insurance. This effects an unequal burden of financing the insurance for the different memberships of the two branches. Since the privately insured members on average include both the lower risks as well as the higher incomes the premiums covering the costs would be only one fourth of the premiums in the public insurance. Privately insured members are, hence, considerably less financially burdened than publicly insured members. This, however, contradicts the judgement of the German Federal Constitutional Court which called for a balanced burden-sharing between the two branches of the nursing care insurance for the people.

In order to distribute the financial burden fairly Rothgang and Kalwitzki advocated the introduction of a so called Citizen Nursing Care Insurance. It not only integrates the two existing branches of insurance but also adds additional forms of income (for example rental revenues or profits from interest) to the roster of incomes from which compulsory insurance premiums have to be deducted. And it increases the assessment ceiling up to which premiums have to be deduced. This will lead to a financial relief for the members of the public insurance branch and for the low-income members of the private insurance branch.

Rothgang and Kalwitzki also pointed to the fact that such a citizen insurance system can be implemented more easily in the realm of nursing care than for example in the realm of the normal health care system. Both the private as well as the public branches of the nursing care insurance are already based on similar regulations concerning services and service delivery. This reduces greatly possible resistance and implementation problems compared for example to the health insurance system.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Heinz Rothgang
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58557
E-Mail: rothgang@uni-bremen.de

Longer Better Living.-InstituteLonger Better Living.-Institute
Topical Issues and Renowned Speakers Guarantee Gerd Glaeske and the BKK24 a Full Audience

How can we motivate people of different social backgrounds to change their life style, their fitness behavior and their eating habits in order to live a healthier, longer and more satisfying life? The Second Congress for “A Longer Better Life” offers an interesting program put together by Professor Gerd Glaeske of SOCIUM and the BKK24. The congress will commence on May 14th, 2019 at the Adademie des Sports in Hanover. Since it is still the social background which determines the life expectancy the congress aims at exploring the possibilities to improve the individual motivation. The topical question guaranteed that the congress was fully booked in short time.

The Congress for “A Longer Better Life” is part of the preventive work of the Institute for “A Longer Better Life” which organized by the SOCIUM together with the BKK24.

More information: Longer Better Living.-Institute


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Gerd Glaeske
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 3
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58559
E-Mail: gglaeske@uni-bremen.de