Events

Place:
Akademie für Weiterbildung, University of Bremen
Room: B 0770/80
Boulevard (unter der Mensa)
28359 Bremen
Time:
9.30 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Contact Person:
Organization:
Prof. Dr. Betina Hollstein; Dr. Thomas Kühn (University of Bremen); Prof. Dr. Thomas Leithäuser (University of Bremen); Prof. Dr. Uwe Schimank
Semester:
SoSe 2014

27.11.2014Methods-Workshop

Einführung in die Software f4/f5 und f4 Analyse

Thorsten Dresing (University of Marburg)
Place:
IW3
Am Biologischen Garten 2
28359 Bremen
Time:
4:15 p.m.
Contact Person:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

15.01.2015 - 16.01.2015International Workshop

Qualitative Comparative Analysis. Social Science Applications and Methodological Challenges

Prof. Dr. Betina Hollstein; Dr. Jörg Raab (Tilburg University); Prof. Dr. Claudius Wagemann (Goethe University Frankfurt)
Place:
Tilburg University
Warandelaan 2
5037 AB Tilburg, The Netherlands
Time:
15.1.: 2:15 - 6 p.m. and 16.1.: 9:15 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Contact Person:
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

15th January 2015

14.15 Begin Conference, Welcome

14.15 -15.45 Analyzing Social Inequality

Camilla Borgna:
Different systems, same inequalities? The social stratification of cognitive skills in 18 OECD countries

Ramsey Wise:
Does Market Orientation in Education Improve Performance or Increase Inequality? Developing a Conceptual Framework for Testing (Un)Intended Outcomes with Fuzzy Set Qualitative Comparative Analysis (fsQCA)

Charles Ragin, Peer Fiss:
Set-Theoretic Methods for the Study of Social Inequality: Test Scores, Parental Income, and Poverty

15.45 -16.00 Coffee

16.00 -18.00 Applications in Organization Studies and Political Science

Grégoire Croidieu, Charles- Clemens Rüling:
Why are exemplary and successful practices sometimes not imitated? A configurational study of Penfolds Grange and the Australian wine industry

Stefan Cloudt:
Organizational configurations and performance of Dutch social housing associations

Markus Siewert:
When do Presidents Prevail and Fail within the Legislative Arena -Evaluating President George W. Bush's Success on the Substance of Legislation

Stefan Verweij, Lasse Gerrits, Christian Kroll, Jack Meek, Daniel Schraad-Tischler:
The Relationships between Governance Capacity and Environmental Policy Performance: A Comparative Evaluation of 41 OECD and EU Countries with Fuzzy Set QCA

16th January 2015

09.15 -10.45 QCA in Mixed Methods Research

Jonas Buche, Antje Buche, Markus Siewert:
Comparing OR combining? Assessing the Small Value of Valuing fsQCA Versus Regression Analysis

Alrik Thiem, Michael Baumgartner, Damien Bol:
Still lost in translation: A correction of three misunderstandings between configurational comparativists and regressional analysis

Sho Niikawa, Andreas Corcaci:
Conceptual coordination in applied QCA-based mixed methods research: Reconsidering slippage from the analysis of consensual government formations

10.45 -11.00 Coffee

11.00 - 12.30 Modelling and Methods Issues in QCA

Michael Baumgartner, Alrik Thiem:
When there is more than meets the eye: Model ambiguities in configurational comparative research

Lakshmi Nair, Michael Gibbert:
Combining Comparative Outlier Analysis and QCA: A review of 26 years (missed) opportunities for theory building in Management and Organizational Research

Carsten Schneider, Ingo Rohlfing:
Over- and Underfitting in Qualitative Comparative Analysis: Theoretical foundations and proper simulations

12.30 -13.15 Lunch

13.15 -14.15 Validity and Criticism of QCA Analyses and Results

Alessia Damonte:
Interesting results -but are they valid?

Benoît Rihoux:
On trench warfare and hand grenades. Essay from the battlefield of critiques against QCA and set-theoretic methods

14.15 -15.00 Closing Discussion

Place:
COGNIUM - Rotunde
Enrique-Schmidt-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Time:
6:15 p.m.
Contact Person:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

Peter V. Marsden, Edith and Benjamin Geisinger Professor of Sociology, Harvard University. Marsden's research interests are centered on social organization, especially formal organizations and social networks. He has studied survey measurement of social networks and research methods for establishment surveys. Marsden is involved in the ongoing data collection efforts of the General Social Survey and has been a lead investigator of three National Organization Studies conducted between 1991 and 2003. Since 2011 he serves as Dean of Social Science at Harvard University.

Abstract: 
Based on a comparison of the 2004 and 1985 General Social Surveys (GSS), a pro-minently-reported finding suggested that a dramatic decline in the availability of confiding relationships to adult Americans had taken place. This presentation reports on two studies suggesting that such a conclusion may not be warranted. One focuses on trends in the frequency of socializing with others between 1974 and 2008; it finds no general trend toward more or less social activity, though some over-time differences in types of socializing are evident-in particular, toward less socializing with neighbors. The second study suggests that the 1985-2004 difference in confiding may be due to differences in questionnaire placement of the "name generator" items on which the finding rests.

Place:
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Room: 5.4680
Mary-Somerville-Straße 7
28359 Bremen
Time:
9 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Contact Person:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

Program:
9 a.m. 
Welcome

9.15 a.m. 
Christof Wolf (Mannheim U): Challenges of egocentric network instruments

10.05 a.m. 
Valentina Hlebec (Ljubljana U): Methodological considerations in the collection of ego-centered network data

10.55 a.m. 
Coffee break

11.10 a.m. 
Beate Völker (Utrecht U): Measuring Social Networks, Social Capital and Social Cohesion

12.00 p.m. 
Lunch Break

1.15 p.m. 
Peter Marsden (Harvard U): Social perception and social networks

2.05 p.m. 
coffee & tea pick up

2.10 p.m. 
Betina Hollstein, Michael Windzio & Uwe Engel (Bremen U): A longitudinal study to develop and test items for ego-centered network support

12.03.2015 - 13.03.2015Symposium

11th International Young Scholar German Socio-Economic Panel

Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK)
Place:
Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK)
Lehmkuhlenbusch 4
27753 Delmenhorst
Time:
9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Organization:
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

26.03.2015Bridge-Lecture

The settings model. A stochastic actor-oriented model for dynamics of large networks

Prof. Tom Snijders (University of Groningen)
Place:
Guesthouse, University of Bremen
Auf dem Teerhof 58
28199 Bremen
Time:
1:15 p.m.
Contact Person:
Cooperation:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

About person: Tom A.B. Snijders is Professor of Statistics and Methodology at the Dept. of Sociology, University of Groningen, Emeritus Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford and an Associate Member at the Dept. of Statistics, University of Oxford.

26.03.2015Methods-Workshop

Analysis of longitudinal social network data with R Siena

Prof. Tom Snijders (University of Groningen)
Place:
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Room: 5.4680
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Time:
10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Contact Person:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
WiSe 2014/15

About person: Tom A.B. Snijders is Professor of Statistics and Methodology at the Dept. of Sociology, University of Groningen, Emeritus Fellow, Nuffield College, University of Oxford and an Associate Member at the Dept. of Statistics, University of Oxford.

Abstract:
This workshop is about statistical inference for longitudinal observations on social networks. Longitudinal social network data are understood here as two or more repeated observations of a directed graph on a given node set (usually between 30 and a few hundred nodes). The workshop teaches the statistical method to analyze such data, for which a tutorial is given in Snijders, T.A.B., Steglich, C.E.G., and van de Bunt, G.G. (2010), Introduction to actor-based models for network dynamics (Social Networks), and implemented in the RSiena program.

The statistical model is the actor-oriented model where the nodes are actors whose choices determine the network evolution. This allows to include various network effects (reciprocity, transitivity, cycles, popularity, etc.), effects of individual covariates (covariates connected to the sender, the receiver, or the similarity between sender and receiver), and of dyadic covariates.

An important extension is to have, in addition to the network, one or more actor variables that evolve in mutual dependence with the network; an example is a friendship network of adolescents where drinking behavior is a relevant actor variable which influences, and is influenced by, the friendship network. This leads to models for the simultaneous dynamics ('co-evolution') of networks and behavior, which are a special option in RSiena. Further information about this method can be found at the SIENA website (see below).

The statistical analysis is based on many repeated Monte Carlo simulations of the network evolution model and therefore is a bit time-consuming. The computer program RSiena is a package in the statistical computer system R. The workshop will demonstrate the basics of using RSiena. Attention will be paid to the underlying statistical methodology, to examples, and to the use of the software.

The first session is intended for those without previous experience with this method, and will focus on the intuitive understanding of the model and operation of the software.

The second session will present models for the simultaneous dynamics of networks and behavior and other more advanced topics such as model specification, multivariate networks, structurally determined values, and goodness of fit checking.

Participants are requested to check the SIENA website (Courses-activities tab) in the week before the workshop to download the workshop materials. For optimal benefit, it is advisable to bring an own laptop with R and RSiena already installed, such that some steps of data manipulation and analysis can be followed hands-on. Participants for whom R is new are requested to learn the basics of R before the workshop: how to run R and how to give basic R commands. This is to reduce the amount of new material to digest at the workshop itself. The Siena website (RSiena tab) has some links which can be helpful for this purpose: it's not hard!

Place:
Guesthouse of the University of Bremen
Teerhof 58
28199 Bremen
Time:
2015/03/27: 9.30 am - 7 pm and 2015/03/28: 10 am - 1 pm
Organization:

Contributors and presentations:

Lars Leszczensky und Sebastian Pink (University of Mannheim):
Ethnic Segregation of Friendship Networks in School: Testing a Rational Choice Argument of Differences in Ethnic Homophily between Classroom‐ and Grade‐Level
Networks

Mathias Kuhnt (Technical University of Dresden):
Homophily, Preferential Attachment oder Triadic Closure?
Wie Strukturbildungsprozesse bei der Evolution von Freundschaftsnetzwerken die Topologie bestimmen

Robert Birkelbach und Clemens Kroneberg (University of Cologne):
Using the Intergenerational Closure Mechanism to Explain Differences of School Achievements of Immigrant Children in Germany

Katja Möhring (Universitäty of Bremen): 
Cross‐level interaction effects in multilevel analyses using random and fixed effects regression models. Simulation study and examples for application

Patrick Lazarevič, Johannes Kopp and Anja Steinbach (University of Dortmund): 
Im Auge des Betrachters? Eine dyadische Untersuchung der 'Intergenerational Stake Hypothese' und Implikationen für die Forschungspraxis

Tom Snijders (Keynote speaker, University of Groningen / University of Oxford):
The settings model: A stochastic actor‐oriented model for dynamics of large networks

Stefanie Kley (University of Hamburg): 
Welche Paarbeziehungen sind durch hohe Mobilitätsanforderungen gegenüber Frauen gefährdet? Eine Fuzzy‐Set Analyse

Andreas Haupt (Karlsruhe Institute for Technology / Institut for Sociology): 
Die Bedeutung geschlechtsspezifischer Sample für die Analyse der Geschlechterlohnlücke

Silke Schneider (GESIS - Leibniz-Institute for Social Sciences, Mannheim): 
Die Messung von Bildung in Umfragen

Horst‐Alfred Heinrich (University of Passau): 
Sehen und erkennen: Analyse von Eye‐Tracking‐Daten zur Erfassung von Bildinhalten

Felix Bader and Thomas Gautschi (University of Mannheim):
Neue experimentelle Ergebnisse zu Tausch in Netzwerken

Eva Maria Vögtle (German Centre for University Research and Sciences Studies, Hannover) und Michael Windzio (University of Bremen): 
The Network of International Student Mobility: Enlargement and Consolidation of the European Transnational Education Space?

Mireia Bolíbar (University of Bremen): 
The use of mixed methods in researching the impact of personal networks in migrants' social and political participation

Sören Petermann und Andreas Herz (Goethe-University, Frankfurt a.M.): 
Interviewer Variationen in der Erhebung Ego‐Zentrierter Netzwerke

Raphael Heiberger (University of Bremen) und Andreas Schmitz (University of Bonn):
Methodologische Implikationen netzwerk‐ und feldanalytischer Relationalitätskonzeptionen. Das Beispiel der relationalen Konstruktion des globalen Sozialraums

Jan R. Riebling (University of Bamberg) und Raphael Heiberger (Universtity of Bremen):
Raum und Relation. Zur methodischen Äquivalenz unterschiedlicher Relationalitätskonzepte

Gerhard Panzer (Technical University Dresden):
Vermittelte Relationen in Feldern und Welten der Kunst

10.06.2015Bridge-Lecture

Environmental Governance in Multi-Stakeholder Contexts. Integrating the Analysis of Decision-Making in Meetings with the Analysis of Network Interactions

Prof. Julia Gluesing (Wayne State University); Prof. Ken Riopelle, Ph.D. (Wayne State University)
Place:
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Room: 5.4680
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Time:
6:15 p.m.
Contact Person:
Lecture Series:
Method Lectures of the Bridge Professorship
Semester:
SoSe 2015

Julia Gluesing is a business and organizational anthropologist and Research Professor in Industrial and Systems Engineering at Wayne State University.
Ken Riopelle is an educator, entrepreneur, management consultant and Research Professor at Wayne State University. His professional career spans over 40 years in both the auto industry and academia.

Abstract:
The purpose of this lecture is to report on and discuss a U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) study regarding the integration of research methods to investigate Environmental Governance in Multi-Stakeholder Contexts (see for details the Award Abstract).

Most studies of “participatory” environmental governance have focused their analysis primarily on one of two decision-making contexts: either the stakeholder meetings where actual decisions are negotiated or the broader interactions among networks of stakeholders that influence those meeting decisions. Yet on their own, each of these approaches has serious limitations. Putting the spotlight on stakeholder meetings may hide the significance of negotiations that take place outside the meetings. Focusing on broader interactions among stakeholder networks may hide the agency of meeting participants in negotiating decision outcomes in the meetings, and the ways in which meeting negotiations are constrained by cultural ideologies of interaction.

It is important to integrate the examination of meetings and broader stakeholder interactions because that is a closer approximation of the messy, complex reality of decision-making on the ground. In actual practice, most members of environmental governance committees are influenced by interactions with their social networks, and such interactions include email and the use of social media.

By integrating the analysis of five information sources - newspaper articles, blog, email, meeting minutes, and ordinances - this study breaks new methodological ground to expand the boundaries of previous research designs.