News

Information on press releases and publications of the department "Life Course, Life Course Policy, and Social Integration".

"Moving for the Kids" and the consequences for the resident segregation. The perceived quality of schools and neighborhoods as the cause of residential mobility of families with and without a migration background.

"Moving for the Kids" – residential mobility of families can be motivated to improve the developmental opportunities for the children. On the basis of regionally comparative standardized surveys the planned project examines, how the perceived quality of schools and neighborhoods - among other reasons - influences relocations and housing decisions of families with and without a migration background. For the first time in Germany, the question of whether – in connection with perceived contextual factors of school and neighborhood – parents' motives for maintaining or improving the educational status of their children as well as for maintaining ethnic-cultural capital trigger small-scale migrations is being systematically investigated. These relocations can intensify (white flight) or reduce (spatial assimilation) ethnic segregation - and at the same time influence the kind and extent of social segregation. The project contributes to the analysis of the causes of the spatial mobility behaviour of families with and without a migration background in Germany, but extended by the presumably central factor of parental status resp. aspiration.
We expect that housing decisions of young couples and families, especially those from the middle class, are also affected by to which extend they view the local school and neighbourhood as being conducive to the education and development of their (future) children. Contextual characteristics such as high poverty rates and high concentration of migrants in the neighbourhood and schools are perceived as "push" factors. For families with a migration background we suspect that there are motives for preserving local ethnic-cultural capital, which could lower the relevance of educationally motivated moves.
In the first step, it will be clarified how strongly motives of children's educational success - also among other motives - influence the assessment of local context conditions, whether families with and without a migration background differ in this respect, and how these motives trigger relocations in interaction with the perceived social and ethnic composition of schools and neighbourhoods. In a second step, it will be investigated how realized moves - aggregated at the macro level - support ethnic and social segregation. Using simulation models in this step also the development of ethnic and social segregation shall predicted on the basis of empirically found determinants of relocations in a regionally comparative manner.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Johannes Huinink
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58535
E-Mail: huinink@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Michael Windzio
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58629
E-Mail: mwindzio@uni-bremen.de

A new Project has been approved by the German Research Foundation

Loss of income, educational panic or burn-out problems in the middle classes keep making headlines. The question of whether the middle classes are disturbed in their 'comfort zone' and whether the seemingly self-evident security is no longer valid for their own children is the subject of various and controversial public debates. In fact, little is known about the lifestyle of the middle classes in Germany. Sociologists from various departments of the SOCIUM will now investigate in a research project recently approved by the German Research Foundation (DFG) which events and developments lead to insecurity and how middle class people deal with these irritations.

In the three-year study (funding volume approx. 400,000 euros) with the title "Investing in Status as a Mode of Living: Practices, Conditions, Disturbances" members of different subgroups of the middle class, also in comparison to members of lower classes, are intensively interviewed on several areas of life such as work, partnership, investments to find out to what extent irritations in these areas affect the entire lifestyle.

The study is part of a larger research programme prepared by Uwe Schimank, Betina Hollstein and Karin Gottschall in collaboration with other sociologists at the University of Bremen and beyond. In addition to the qualitative study mentioned above, in which the postdoctoral researchers and doctoral students Nils C. Kumkar, Rixta Wundrak and Stefan Holubek will also be involved, further projects will investigate the lifestyle of the middle classes in a representative, longitudinal and international comparative manner.


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Karin Gottschall
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58595
E-Mail: karin.gottschall@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Betina Hollstein
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58512
E-Mail: betina.hollstein@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Uwe Schimank
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58564
E-Mail: uwe.schimank@uni-bremen.de

DFG approves funding for the next two years from May 2016 onwards.

The German Family Panel pairfam (“Panel Analysis of Intimate Relationships and Family Dynamics”), which was largely initiated by sociologists at the University of Bremen, enters the next round: In December 2015, the German Research Foundation (DFG) approved the survey waves 9 and 10 of pairfam. The funding volume for the 24-month period is around five million euros, of which about 20 percent will go to the University of Bremen. The first wave of interviews took place in 2008/2009. The project is scheduled to run for a total of 14 years. The pairfam data are available for scientific analysis and can be obtained from the GESIS Institute. The number of registered users was over 1150 in 2015.


Pairfam is jointly conducted by the Universities of Bremen (Professor Johannes Huinink), Chemnitz (Professor Bernhard Nauck), Jena (Professor Franz Neyer), Cologne (Professor Karsten Hank) and Munich (Professor Josef Brüderl, Professor Sabine Walper).


Further Information:

Panel Analysis of Intimate Relationships and Family Dynamics (Pairfam)


Contact:
Dr. Petra Buhr
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58539
E-Mail: buhr@uni-bremen.de

Prof. Dr. Johannes Huinink
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58535
E-Mail: huinink@uni-bremen.de

Timo Peter
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 9
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58542
E-Mail: timo.peter@uni-bremen.de