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Information on press releases and related news of the department "Dynamics of Inequality in Welfare Societies".

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Simone Scherger, Steffen Hagemann: Concepts of Retirement and the Evaluation of Post-Retirement Work. Positions of Political Actors in Germany and the UK

Concepts of retirement and related moral arguments play an important role in debates around pension reform. What retirement is - or should be - varies according to the surrounding welfare culture and an actor’s general interests and beliefs.

In this paper, we study the meaning that specific collective actors in Germany and the UK attribute to retirement, and their evaluation of post-retirement work, which is an exception to 'normal' retirement. For this purpose, we examine interviews with experts from unions, employer federations and relevant non-profit organisations which have been conducted in the context of a wider comparative project. Additionally, we draw on policy documents by the same actors. Our analysis of the interviews and the documents reveals similar retirement concepts among the same kinds of actors across countries: trade unions and at least some non-profit organisations advocate retirement as a social right and as a distinct (ideally work-free) phase of life. In contrast, employers have a less substantial concept of retirement. At the same time, when morally justifying what retirement should be in their view, the actors refer to ideas that establish a connection to the specific welfare culture surrounding them.

Download: ZeS Working Paper 04/2014

Starting with winter term 2013-14 for Faculty 8 Social Sciences

In the faculty council meeting of June 12, 2013 of faculty 8 Social Sciences Prof. Dr. Bernd Zolitschka was elected Dean. Prof. Dr. Karin Gottschall was proposed and appointed by the council to become Vice Dean. Both will assume office in the upcoming winter term and their appointment will be valid for two years. 

Legal and institutional incentives for undocumented work in private households in GermanyLegal and institutional incentives for undocumented work in private households in Germany
By Karin Gottschall and Manuela Schwarzkopf

Private households' demand for support in housekeeping, childcare and care of elderly is increasing. In Germany, it is met mainly by undocumented work.

The report shows that this constellation is eased by legal and institutional regulations: Social as well as tax legislation promote a marginal employment of married women. Restrictive rules for additional earnings in the social welfare law and high charges on low wage incomes are often a hindrance to the improvement of welfare recipients' and low-paid workers' precarious economic situation by regular work. Foreigners from a non-EU member state eventually have - due to restrictive immigration legislation - few possibilities to take up legal work in Germany. The interest in regular work might be raised (i.a.) by an increase of the upper limits on additional earning and the promotion of employment which ensures livelihoods in domestic services.

Publication:
Gottschall, Karin; Schwarzkopf, Manuela, 2011: Legal and institutional incentives for undocumented work in private households in Germany. Stocktaking and problem-solving approaches, 238/2011, Düsseldorf: Hans-Böckler-Stiftung

Further information and order of the working paper:
Hans-Böckler-Stiftung


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Karin Gottschall
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58595
E-Mail: karin.gottschall@uni-bremen.de

from left to right: Steffen Hagemann, Simone Scherger, Anna Hokema, Thomas Lux from left to right: Steffen Hagemann, Simone Scherger, Anna Hokema, Thomas Lux
The German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft) will fund a project on "Paid work beyond retirement age in Germany and Britain", as part of the Emmy Noether programme for excellent young researchers.

Starting from October 2010, an independent junior research group lead by Simone Scherger will study the structures and conditions of paid employment among retirees, its biographical significance, and the collective discourses around old age, paid employment, old age provision and the welfare state.

Until now, paid employment in retirement has been an atypical combination of work, payments from a pension (or several pensions) and old age. This combination is counter to the assumed finality of retirement. The project aims at investigating the forms and conditions of paid employment in retirement in a perspective which compares Germany with Britain. The group will examine the incidence and structures of paid work in retirement, and the biographical constellations in the areas of work and family which lead to retirees engaging in paid work. Furthermore, the biographical significance of this form of work and the framing collective discourses around work, age and old age security will be studied. Comparing Germany and Britain sheds a light on the importance of the underlying welfare state regulations and traditions, and the combination of quantitative and qualitative methods will facilitate a dialogue between structure oriented and action oriented perspectives.

Further information: German Research Foundation (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft): Emmy Noether Programme


Contact:
Prof. Dr. Karin Gottschall
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58595
E-Mail: karin.gottschall@uni-bremen.de

Dr. Simone Scherger
SOCIUM Research Center on Inequality and Social Policy
Mary-Somerville-Straße 5
28359 Bremen
Phone: +49 421 218-58569
E-Mail: simone.scherger@uni-bremen.de

During the winter semester of 2011/12, at the start of the exchange, faculty and students in Bremen were able to welcome the first student from Chapel Hill.

The Master Programme in Social Policy has been a member of a transatlantic student exchange programme since 2010. The Transatlantic Master Program (TAM), initiated by the renowned Center for European Studies at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, comprises a consortium of ten European universities. Together the Universities of Chapel Hill, Bremen, Pompeu Fabra/Barcelona and VU Amsterdam cooperate in a so-called 'research track'.

During the winter semester of 2011/12, at the start of the exchange, faculty and students in Bremen were able to welcome the first student from Chapel Hill. In 2012/2013 the programme featured its first guests, including the first female student seeking to complete a degree in Bremen. A new decisive innovation for the 2013/2014 academic year will allow for a transition to a double degree in TAM/Master Social Policy: students will spend one year in Chapel Hill and one year in Bremen. This is an intensive study program that includes a mandatory internship followed by mutual supervision while writing the master's thesis.

The opportunity to complete an interdisciplinary and European-oriented focus in the field of European Labour Studies is provided starting in the winter semester of 2010/2011 as part of the Master's Programme in Social Policy at the University of Bremen. These include supplementary courses abroad that are implemented in cooperation with foreign partner universities. Students studying at one of the partner universities obtain an international certification in the Master Européen en Sciences du Travail (MEST). With this certificate, acquired skills and competencies in the Master Programme in Social Policy will be expanded with the addition of an international profile.

More information: 
European Labour Studies / MEST
European Masters Labour Studies Network


Contact:
Dr. Simone R. Haasler